Which Grain Will Grow, and Which Will Not: On Syntax, Paradigm, and Myth

I think that narratives are important to understand for the same reason that I write about postmodernism so much: as chaotic and unpredictable as the world-at-large can be, we have to remember that the human brain is the most advanced pattern-recognition organ on the planet. We look at the world and we find stories and then we share those stories. If you look at how we talk about memory, then that’s a story to, and in a very real sense, it means that each and every one of us is made out of narrative in a very real way.

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Cathderals of the Eye and Tongue: Notes on Social Construction

Social Construction is less like building a shed in your back yard and more like the process by which stone carvers and carpenters and artisans of all stripes built up a medieval cathedral. Each one adds their own twist to it, reinterpreting a master plan that was conceived of before they were born and would be realized long after they die. It is not construction in the sense of the finished building but in the sense of an ongoing process.

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Edgar's Book Round-Up, July-September 2019

It’s been a rockier road with reading, though I see now that I said roughly the same thing the last time I subjected everyone to my reading list. I also neglected to mention what else was on my plate while I was being underwhelmed by Eugene Thacker, so we’ll start there.

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Against Enclosure: Garrett Hardin's "The Tragedy of the Commons" is a House Built on Sand

So, yesterday, I made the tremendous sacrifice of reading “The Tragedy of the Commons” by Garrett Hardin, so you don’t have to. Hardin is not the canny thinker that they believe he is, and reading the original “Tragedy of the Commons” article he published in Science on 13 December 1968 shows just how flawed his reasoning is – and how bankrupt future ideological edifices built atop it are.

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