Posts tagged Nostalgia
Present Unheimlich: William Gibson's Blue Ant Trilogy

Pattern Recognition by William Gibson is the first of a loose trilogy – called, alternatively, the Blue Ant or Bigend trilogy – that also includes Spook Country and Zero History. Pattern Recognition was released in 2003, and was set in the summer of 2002 – the events of September 11 form the backdrop for the plot, but are not center stage

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Confluences: The Nostalgia Trap, pt. 5

It was V. that brought me to Thrice, actually, and not the other way around. I distinctly remember having read V. already, and then, not that long after, being in a Wal-Mart in Bedford, PA and seeing Vheissu, their then-most recent album. I was stunned to see such an obvious reference to a novel I had first heard about from my father, who basically only remembered chapter 3, in which a character named Stencil does several “impressions” of not-himself, with each section of the chapter narrated by the person he’s pretending to be at the time. Also there’s like, robot secret agents or something, and everyone’s in Cairo in the late 19th century.

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The Nostalgic, The Uncanny, and The Unheimlich: On ''Over the Garden Wall.'

Despite what I said a while back about History and Nostalgia being opposites (and, don't get me wrong, I largely stand by that) it may be more appropriate to say that nostalgia and the uncanny are entangled antitheses: the former a longing for the past, and the latter an unwelcome intrusion of the past into the present. And if Stranger Things is the apotheosis of nostalgia in television, then I submit that the avatar of the uncanny is the animated miniseries Over the Garden Wall.

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Why Are We Haunted by the 1980s?: Stranger Things and the Notalgia Trap

We talk about nostalgia a lot, so it's inevitable that we have to talk about Stranger Things. Full disclosure, Edgar and I enjoyed the first few seasons, and despite reservations we are also enjoying the third one. Those reservations are fairly strong, though. Some people have said that this is the best season yet. We politely but firmly disagree.

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On Reactionary Cute: How Childish Images and Nostalgia Hack Our Minds

One might ask how we got here, but that's a topic for a historian (May's book seems to be a good trailhead.) If I were to have to venture a guess, I would look to the addition of liminal states between child and adult: the teenager, the "emerging adult", and so on. Another suspicion would be the emphasis placed on youth culture since the 1950s, and especially the youth culture of the 1950s and 1960s. If your life is effectively over at 30, then of course you're going to live in denial about being over thirty, of course you're going to tell war stories about what you were doing when you were nineteen, of course you're going to lie to yourself.

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