Cameron's Book Reviews: Spring 2019

Alex is hard at work on the next episode — as Episode 8 is to Edgar, so Episode 9 is to me, so I’m very excited for it. Of course, we’re admittedly a bit behind: it’s inevitable. Alex works tech support, I’m an Adjunct, Charlie has a job at a museum. We’re not always able to put the time towards our creative endeavors that we would like.

One thing, however, that we can manage, is to read: we’re all avid readers, and we try to stay abreast of what’s going on with the written word. Here are some highlights from what I’ve read this Spring:

The Worst Is Yet To Come: A Post-Capitalist Survival Guide by Peter Fleming (Repeater Books, 2019)

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Warren Ellis reviewed this one a little while back, and that’s what pointed me towards it, originally. The fact that it’s the one thing I’ve fond in the Venn Diagram where one circle is “Mark Fisher-related things” and the other is “Warren Ellis-related things” to be placed in the crosshatch sold me on it.

Fleming is a New Zealander who worked in London and meditated on the slow decline of Neoliberal Capitalism into something feral and malign — or, as he puts it at least once, “the same, but shittier.” It’s a work of “Speculative Negativity” where he despairs about whether any one of us can escape the situation we’re in, but holds out a sort of hope that someone does. It’s a survival guide (as the title suggests) and each chapter ends with a series of aphorisms and pieces of advice, ranging from “We’re asked to believe that writing useless emails all day is analogous to hunting and gathering in a previous age. We would perish without it. Biological self-preservation, however, is not secured through modern work…increasingly, the opposite is the case” to “Fuck Big Data.”

It’s a solid read, highly recommended, if only because it will make you think — it’s a bit on the short side, and I would have liked to see more meditation on what he’s bringing up, working it all together, but it’s entirely possible that this is too bloody an enterprise for someone to stick with for too long.

Blackfish City by Sam J. Miller (Harper Collins, 2018)

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The story of a city built on the ocean after the climate has turned. Qaanaak is a city without maps and without a history. People from all over the world, from lowly dispossessed refugees to New York Plutocrats fleeing the death of their city, have ended up there and constructed something new. Qaanaak is sustainable, vibrant, and riddled with the same greed and corruption as the old world. It’s a city where a mysterious disease, called “The Breaks” threatens the social order. People in Qaanaak don’t talk about their past, but the Breaks cause those who suffer it to experience the memories of others before they finally pass, before their body breaks and their mind slips out.

And the match thrown on this powder keg is the Orcamancer: on page 1 of the book, a mysterious woman arrives in a boat pulled by an Orca, accompanied by a polar bear with its jaws muzzled and its paws caged, and begins to set about her work — which, given her accompaniment and martial bearing, can’t be anything but bloody.

The book is quite good — it has a great plot, and stellar representation of both characters of color (I read the Orcamancer as Inuit, and there are characters from China and India, as well as a very prominent black New Yorker,) and queer characters (both homosexual and nonbinary characters are represented, and the story of the Breaks seems to be consciously modeled off of the AIDS epidemic, at least in how people respond to it. One downside, though, seemed to be that sometimes the characters took actions solely to forward the plot instead of because it’s what they wanted.

The Water Knife by Paolo Bacigalupi (Alfred A. Knopf, 2015)

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I really enjoyed Bacigalupi’s first novel, The Wind-Up Girl, and thought I’d catch up on his latest a while back. While The Wind-Up Girl seemed to be a biopunk reworking or send-up of Madam Butterfly, The Water Knife is pure post-global-warming James Bond.

In a future where the Western states of the US covertly fight one another for control of the finite supply of water, one of the major power players is the head of the Southern Nevada Water Authority, Catherine Case, and her weapon of choice is a man named Angel Velasquez, a so-called “Water Knife” who is tasked with the black ops side of securing a constant flow of water for Las Vegas. Oftentimes, this means trying to stay a step ahead of the operatives of California, the other side of this Cold Civil War that they find themselves in. Much of the plot concerns his attempt to figure out what happened in Phoenix, Arizona, where one of his confederates was killed in a most brutal fashion.

Or the plot concerns Lucy Monroe, a journalist documenting the decline of Phoenix, who has seen more than her share of “swimmers” — dead bodies dropped without ceremony in abandoned swimming pools. She begins a crusade, however, when one of her friends — a lawyer — is found tortured to death, after apparently finding the holy grail of this drought-stricken world, water rights supposedly “senior to God.”

Or the plot is about Maria Villarosa, a young Texan refugee who has been recently orphaned, and who is trying to escape to California or someplace north, anywhere other than Phoenix. And while things begin to look up, she is caught in a horrifying situation and must try to keep her head above (metaphorical) water.

It’s a good book. Very quick and readable, and Bacigalupi does a good job of emulating his chosen “text” without simply copying it into a new milieu. On the other hand, much like The Wind-Up Girl, it’s a frustratingly narrow look into a much wider world, and there’s a definite desire to see past the edges of the text. Just how localized is the drought, anyway? Does this link up to Wind-Up Girl or does it connect to the stories of Pump 6?

Currently Reading

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Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia, volume 1 by Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari (Penguin Classics, 1972)

A most frustrating book. But there’s a lot going on there.

It’s a work of ethics, or political science, or psychology, or ontology. It synthesizes Freud and Marx, where it isn’t talking about Artaud and Nietzsche.

The principle subject is the Body without Organs and Desiring-Machines. Whatever those are.

The upshot is that it’s a very strange book, which I’m not quite prepared to give a complete review of. On a global level, it’s nonsense, and on the level of individual sentences, it’s full of profound aphorisms.

When it isn’t the reverse.

I don’t know. I really don’t know.

"Do You Consider Yourself Anti-Capitalist?": On Making Political Art

My parents are renovating the house I grew up in, and their kitchen has been unusable for some time. As Edgar can attest, one of my primary means of showing affection is making food for people: for me, nothing shows care quite so much as sharing a home-made meal, so I brought them dinner (vegetarian chili, with a small container of browned beef alongside it, in case they didn’t want to have it vegetarian.)

While there, I spoke to my mother about the ongoing loneliness epidemic that has been on my mind lately: I’m an adjunct instructor, and I’ve recently gotten a crop of so-called “Generation Z” students. These young people are (according to experts,) the most isolated generation in recorded history, and who have the most precarious mental health situation of any living generation, succumbing in record numbers to anxiety and depression. I am I feel, not improperly, worried about them.

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How Creativity Works: Bisociation and Dreaming Playlists

This is going to be quick and dirty, but it’s a repeatable method. At this point, where the barrier of entry for making a podcast, comic, or similar is so low, you need every edge you can get, and a lot of people think that you can skimp on writing, or that any artist or musician or whatever can do it (you can’t do that any more than the writer can make the music or draw the art.) Like I said, you need every edge. You have to use Bisociation.

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The Stranger: Vanishing Hitchhikers and Other Possibilities

The Stranger, the ghostly figure who picks up Seeger and delivers him back to Malpais in episode seven, is an echo or a remix of several figures throughout literary and holy texts. He is, possibly, the most folkloric figure within Perdition's Teeth: more rooted in the American -- and, admittedly, some older -- legends than many of the other characters.

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Can't Wait For the Next Episode?

So, I’m a teacher who just went through finals week, Edgar recently got full time at their job, and Alex has a full time job and just went through a major life change that I’ll let him reveal at his own pace. The point is that, while we all believe in — and are dedicate to — Broken Hands Media, we have other things going on and sometimes a week just sucker-punches you right in the teeth.

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Down The Highway of the Damned: American Gothic

Perdition’s Teeth borrows from many sources — it is consciously formatted as an epic, it draws from Hardboiled and Road Fiction (most obviously Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, and — indirectly, Whose Names are Unknown, by Sanora Babb, the woman who did all of the research for both novels.) The one well that Edgar and I kept coming back to is that of regional American Gothic.

North America is a vast continent, spanning thousands of miles — the tag line comes from the distance between Oklahoma City (where the second episode begins, at the chronological beginning of the series) and Goldfield, where the first episode begins in media res. Between these two places, the heroes meet dangers both mundane and fantastic, and it is in this borderland that the gothic thrives — the tension between two poles, and the irreconcilable conflict between them.

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No-Man's Land: World War One and Its Aftershocks

In episode five of Perdition’s Teeth, “Homestead,” the narrator informs us that, as he traipses across a barren expanse of farmland, Seeger is reminded of Flanders’ field and no-man’s land, the colloquial term for the space between the trenches of the Allied and Central powers. The dust-driven plains of the Great American Desert, and the waste land of mud and barbed wire that characterized the Western Front, on which Seeger fought, bear some clear similarities: their hostility, their alien appearance, and their silent threat of imminent danger would parallel one another in Seeger’s mind.

But what did World War One mean for America? For Americans? The United States didn’t join the war until April of 1917, after the release of the Zimmermann telegram (a drama of high intrigue by itself), though after the sinking of the Lusitania by German submarines, a movement towards “Preparedness” emerged. But initially, US popular opinion was against joining the war, with many different groups favoring neutrality for different reasons (Irish Americans because they were loath to aid the British, for the example, and many German Americans still had ties to Germany). Woodrow Wilson won a second term in 1916 in part thanks to the slogan, “He kept us out of war.” And even when the US did enter the war, they were beset by a variety of problems: the standing army at the start of the war was not large, and racial relations within the US military were fraught, to put it mildly. But, as David Smith noted last year in The Guardian, “[T]he war had seismic implications for the US economically, socially and culturally,” pointing out that in many ways US involvement in World War One paved the way for the cultural shifts of the twentieth century.

For Seeger, much as for John Dos Passos or Ernest Hemingway, his enlistment would have come about as the US hastily assembled almost five million troops to ship out to aid the Allied forces. With the French and British militaries in poor morale, the arrival of a bunch of Americans was looked on as a godsend. As Vera Brittain writes in her memoir, Testament of Youth:

“Look! Look! Here are the Americans! ”

I pressed forward with the others to watch the United States physically entering the War, so god-like, so magnificent, so splendidly unimpaired in comparison with the tired, nerve-racked men of the British Army.

Although American involvement in the war was relatively brief, and casualties relatively low with respect to raw numbers, it nonetheless affected a generation of writers — and disaffected many of the people called to enlist.

Though the American deployment only lasted a year and a half, American soldiers met the same horrors that their British, French, and Commonwealth allies had been enduring for three years when they entered the fray. The scars would last a lifetime, and within the fiction of Perdition’s Teeth, we can see those traumas lingering on Seeger’s mind. He puts on a blase attitude, but his actions show a desire for the world to make sense and for things to go back to making as much sense as it did when he was younger.

Many of the men who came home were hollowed out by the experience, and they fought with the government for their pensions for years afterward. Many of these soldiers, while they had been paid at the time of their service, were required to wait for their whole payment — they were promised $1.25 for each day serving overseas, and $1.00 for each day serving in the United States (roughly $15 and $12 in 2018 dollars.) The exact amounts were agreed upon in 1924…but were not to be paid out until 1945, twenty-seven years after the war ended.

In the summer of 1932, a year before the events of Perdition’s Teeth, 17,000 out-of-work veterans, and 26,000 sympathizers, marched on Washington, D.C. under the banner of the Bonus Army, demanding immediate cash payment of the money they had been promised. On the 27th of July, former Major General Smedley Butler, in Washington to advocate for the Veterans, walked through the camp, ate with the protesters and stayed with them. The following day, he delivered an off-the-cuff speech to them. He told them that they were within their rights, and that they were fine soldiers. He told them that they needed to keep their humor and be mindful that the public eye was upon them.

This would prove to be an important moment.

Later that day, the protestors clashed with the police, and two of them were shot, but the police were driven off. The army was then dispatched: General Douglas MacArthur and then-Major George S. Patton personally led the 12th Infantry Regiment and the 3rd Cavalry Regiment, supported by six M1917 light tanks against the protesters. It was thought by many that the army was coming out to parade in honor of the veterans, and a crowd of spectators assembled to watch. They were quickly disabused of this notion when Patton ordered a cavalry charge, leading crowd to cry out:

Shame! Shame!

The protesters were then set upon by infantrymen with fixed bayonets and tear gas, who pursued them back to their camp in the Anacostia Flats and brutally demolished it. Fifty-five veterans were injured, one hundred and thirty five were arrested, and the violence resulted in one miscarriage and the death of a twelve-week-old infant.

Burning of the Bonus Army Camp, 1932. (Image: Signal Corps/National Archives)

Burning of the Bonus Army Camp, 1932. (Image: Signal Corps/National Archives)

MacArthur claimed that they had assembled and attempted to overthrow the government, but this was a transparent lie. This event led to the ouster of President Herbert Hoover, and the election of President Roosevelt, but it had more and further-reaching effects.

It is possibly this event that was the final nail in the coffin for Smedley Butler as a military man, leading him to eventually write in the Socialist magazine Common Sense:

I spent 33 years and four months in active military service and during that period I spent most of my time as a high class muscle man for Big Business, for Wall Street and the bankers. In short, I was a racketeer; a gangster for capitalism. I helped make Mexico and especially Tampico safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefit of Wall Street. I helped purify Nicaragua for the International Banking House of Brown Brothers in 1902–1912. I brought light to the Dominican Republic for the American sugar interests in 1916. I helped make Honduras right for the American fruit companies in 1903. In China in 1927 I helped see to it that Standard Oil went on its way unmolested. Looking back on it, I might have given Al Capone a few hints. The best he could do was to operate his racket in three districts. I operated on three continents.

It is not only the war itself, but its still-unfolding half-life, that would come to mind for Seeger as he makes his way towards the barn, and although he hasn’t yet — at the time of the story — become as disillusioned as Butler, he can no doubt sense his world crumbling around him.. The impact of the First World War, not only on our imagined detective or his historical context, but to this very day, continues to turn itself up, like long-buried landmines uncovered live (article dates from 2014).

Inspirations, Part 1: Other Podcasts

Perdition’s Teeth didn’t happen in a vacuum. The other members of the creative team weren’t really into podcasts, but I consumed quite a few — I work delivery and I don’t really like most of what’s on the radio in this town, so I started listening to podcasts. While the informative “talking head” type podcasts are quite good, I’ve got a soft spot for narrative. Some of my favorites are:

  • Alice Isn’t Dead - a weird fiction podcast from Nightvale Presents (whose flagship podcast is quite good at times, but I prefer this one,) that follows a lesbian truck driver searching for her wife. At turns horrifying and heartbreaking, it’s very engaging.

  • Archive 81 - each season of this podcast is radically different. The first season follows an archivist going through the titular archive of “true” stories of the residents of an apartment building, the second season centers on the exploration of a strange other world, and the third follows a pair of siblings conducting a ritual. The seasons are interconnected, and the combination of weird fiction and anti-capitalism is definitely an influence on Peridtion’s Teeth.

  • The Black Tapes Podcast - A monument to what could have been. The Black Tapes ran for two and a half brilliant seasons, pioneering the PNWS style of fictional journalism podcast. It follows journalist Alex Reagan and debunker Doctor Richard Strand as they review the unresolved cases from Strand’s archives.

  • Limetown - while it’s only had one season, this is one of the earliest journalistically-framed fiction podcasts. It follows a journalist — Lia Haddock — trying to figure out what happened at a closed research facility ten years ago, when three hundred people vanished without a trace.

  • Our Fair City - a “post-apocalyptic radio epic” about the inhabitants of a bunker in the middle of a frozen wasteland, run by the insurance company HartLife. It’s been running for eight seasons, and while each episode might only be fifteen minutes or so, there’s such a backlog that it makes a very satisfying binge.

  • SPINES - Think something halfway between X-Men and Serial. A single narrator — Wren, for most of the series — wakes up with no memory of her past, and seeks the eight people who were present in her earliest memory, trying to sort through where she came from and what’s going on.

  • TANIS - Possibly my favorite podcast, following the journalist Nic Silver exploring a myth. Influenced by Mark Z. Danielewski’s House of Leaves and Jeff VanderMeer’s Area X, it draws you in slowly. While the first few episodes are uneven, the second and third seasons are beautifully done.

While there are others, these are the ones that I enjoyed the most while preparing for Perdition’s Teeth, and if you’re waiting for more content from us, there is more than enough in each of these shows to satisfy you.

Writers' Room and Recording Booth: The Headspace of Collaboration

(Edgar wrote an excellent piece on the cowriting process here.)

In many ways Perdition’s Teeth belongs to me — but I don’t consider any of those ways important, and everyone who took part in the process owns a vital piece of it. I would never have it any other way, and it is all of ours.

I’ve mentioned many times that it all started with a misheard lyric in the shower, but before it became a podcast, I ran it as a tabletop game. Edgar was one of my players, and regular guest star Erik Pitcock was another. From the very beginning, it was a collaborative story.

When we shifted over to making it into a podcast, Edgar became my cowriter, and we all agreed that they should be the director. I was playing the narrator, and I did not feel that I could write, act, and direct effectively. That’s more hats than I care to wear.

And all through the process, Alex was asking questions. Key, important questions, about what makes an audio drama an audio drama, about how it should function and come into the world, and while I was immovable on some things, being forced to answer the question of why things were being done the way they were was key.

From the beginning, Edgar and I were firm in the idea that everyone have a voice in the direction. We talked over each of the characters with each of our actors, we gave them our ideas, our outlines, and we took their feedback to make it work. This, I feel, is the lifeblood of collaboration.

When I was in graduate school — down in New Mexico, with the groundwork for this project being welded into my mind — I made a point to read widely, on a number of subjects. Two of the books I read that had a profound and lasting effect were from the 33 & 1/3 books on Slint’s Spiderland and Tom Waits’s Swordfishtrombones. Both of these books deal heavily with cowriting and collaboration, and both depict radically different ends of the spectrum.

Slint, famously, recorded the album Spiderland in two weekends. The first weekend was recording, the second was editing. Everything was a single take. To prepare for this, the members of that band devoted everything to preparing. They slept. They worked. They practiced. That was essentially it. They had long and involved discussions of the minutiae of each song. The book even noted that they spent hours debating the benefits and drawbacks of stroking upward on the guitar as opposed to downward.

Tom Waits, on the other hand, would get studio musicians to come in and would just begin describing what he wanted, playing what he had written thus far, improvising the rest, and allow the studio musicians and collaborators to slot themselves in as they wanted. It was a loose, improvisational style that lent itself to mutation and generated difference.

And so, between these two poles, you have almost the entire universe of collaboration.

My struggle, as a collaborator and, in a very real sense, as the creator, was trying to figure out how to work with other people productively. My struggle is that, while I dearly love Tom Waits, Spiderland is light years beyond Swordfishtrombones.

In the end, though, I couldn’t go with Slint’s approach. While Spiderland really is transcendantly good, the fact of the matter is that there’s only ever been one Spiderland. Slint broke up immediately after the record was released; one member committed himself. On the other hand, Swordfishtrombones was a trailhead, a new direction in an already-long career that has covered more territory than I can even dream of.

If Perdition’s Teeth serves the same role for us, I would be happy. I cannot abide it being unique: I want to follow it with other works.

On Americana

I've heard it often said that Americans don't understand what a long time is, but we have a strong grasp of what a long distance is, while Britons have a much better grasp of long histories and struggle to conceive of the distances that Americans regularly grapple with.

I don't think this is to say that America has a short history.  It just has a short history that modern Americans care about.  Cahokia was, after all, once the largest and most prosperous city in the world, overlooking the muddy breadth of the Mississippi mud.

(I wanted to acknowledge this in the show, by having the characters hear a snatch of a Navajo radio broadcast.  Unfortunately, as I don't know any Navajo speakers and don't know where to begin getting a translation, let alone have any idea where we would find anyone able to deliver these lines.  What could have been!)

But when we hear the word "Americana" what do we think about?  George Washington and the Cherry Tree; Ben Franklin and his patronizing smile; Abraham Lincoln and his stovepipe hat; settlers and the (whitewashed, sanitized) cowboys pushing west...but also Route 66 and roadside kitsch; strange lights in the desert and things from other worlds; roadside diners where the food is greasy and unsanitary but you eat it anyway, and the waitress is beautiful and friendly and the coffee she pours is for you and you alone.

Clearly, there is very much going on here, and not much of it hangs together.  I would argue, personally, that there are either three or five periods of Americana.  The five periods, I would say, are: Colonial-Antebellum; the Old West; the Gilded Age; the Hardboiled period (including everything from the 1920s-1940s;) and the Pax Americana, which includes everything from 1950 to the First of September, 1993.

The more useful model, since I'm not communicating this to a bunch of academics, I would say, goes as follows:  Fireside Americana; Radio Americana; and Television Americana.  The Fireside and the Television are the two biggest stretches for our storytelling, with the Radio as the transitional, hopeful-monster-intermediate between the two longer periods.

While there are probably scholars who have a lot to say on it, and who might strongly object to my classification, here's my take:

Fireside Americana is everything that goes from the Founders of the United States and Washington Irving all the way through Mark Twain (the Pre-Republican era is another matter, a largely forgotten field upon which strange events play out and we only really think about it in the context of it leading to the Revolutionary War.)  It's a hardwood, warmly-lit sort of aesthetic, smelling of smoke and tinged with road-dust and sea salt, a quarrelsome style for the country once known as the "alcoholic republic."

Television Americana is everything from the end of World War II to the opening of the internet.  It's Jack Kerouac and Buddy Holly through John Hughes.  It's chrome and plastic, smelling of petrochemical fumes and summer days in the city, with all of the attendant filth, it's roadside kitsch and pink plastic flamingos, it's long roadtrips taken for the hell of it and probably ends up on a beach somewhere.  It is, by and large, an aesthetic of individualism and consumption.

Radio sits between the two.  Faulkner looks backward but sits here firmly, and you also have Steinbeck and Raymond Chandler carving out their own niches.   Hardwood, but with electric lights strung up.  It's the Americana of the Private Eye, the Carny, and Okie; it's the Little Red Songbook and the Tommy Gun. It's travel by road through treacherous country to escape hardship, but done by car.  It's less summery, less sunny, more night-time.  It's an aesthetic of obscurity, with hard positions popping up and thrusting up like high-rises emerging from the mist.  It ended with World War II and the start of the Cold War (I would say a big part of this was the general rightward turn of American Culture, and possibly even the specific institution of the Taft-Hartley Act, but I digress.)

Perdition's Teeth is, in many ways, an attempt to marry contemporary trends in storytelling and weird fiction to the aesthetics of Radio Americana.  There's the general fact that it's an audio drama, but there's also the prominent appearance of the IWW, the Pinkertons, and a westward journey that nods a bit to The Grapes of Wrath.

It is, in short, an attempt to recapture those early days of Mass Media, and draw upon an aesthetic tradition that has been buried beneath the chrome-and-plastic veneer, but lies buried there, ready to have a layer of varnish applied and start singing "Bread and Roses" again.

PERDITION'S TEETH

Our first major project is Perdition's Teeth, a scripted audio drama set in the American West during the dustbowl, following Okie migrant Everett Arthur Kemp (Dreary Sea,) Ex-Pinkerton Operative John Seeger (Joseph Burnett,) and IWW Organizer Ruth Doyle (Lindsay Weaver,) as they travel west through a dying land, in pursuit of an otherworldly evil.

The Trailer is available here, narrated by Cameron L. Summers and our full regular cast.  The first episode will be available in the next few weeks, so subscribe now!

 

Broken Hands Media: Who We Are and What We Do (Late Summer, 2018.)

Broken Hands Media is a media cooperative based in Kansas City that began in support of the forthcoming scripted audio drama podcast Perdition's Teeth, which we started pre-production on in 2016, and which is finally becoming a real project in the very near future.

The production staff consists of:

  • Myself, Cameron L. Summers, the head writer.
  • Edgar Mason, the director and co-writer.
  • Alex Yoffie, the sound designer and composer.

Our regular cast consists of:

  • Joseph Burnett.
  • Dreary Sea.
  • Lindsay Weaver.

...with the generously donated time and effort of several friends, who will be credited on our Creative Partners page.

Since we committed to this project, our ambitions have grown.  We enjoy working together and many of us do several kinds of art.  Until now, we've been working isolated from one another, finding moments between shifts at work and the business of being alive in the futuristic-sounding year of 2018.  We want to put this podcast out, and it's one that we strongly believe in, but we're always thinking about the next one. 

We've been friends forever, and we want to continue making art together.

And so we will.

Watch this space or further updates.

 

Where Perdition's Teeth Came From

A lot of writers have difficulty articulating where their ideas come from, but I recall exactly how Perdition's Teeth came to be.  I thought I would lay that story out preemptively.

I've long been a fan of weird fiction, because it seems to me that you shouldn't be able to use the names of genres as an easy shorthand for anything but the deeper structure of it -- I dislike saying "fantasy" to describe a story, and immediately having people think of something out of Dungeons and Dragons (don't get me wrong -- I have both played and run more than my fair share of D&D, I just don't think it should be the default.)  And one of the things that I always thought would work is a marriage of the common quest narrative to the distinctly American setting of the Dust Bowl.  I never really did much with the idea, because Edgar had a manuscript they toyed with every now and then that did just that, and I figured that Edgar could do it better than I could, especially after having read some of it.

So I never sat down and worked these ideas out, but they stuck with me.  Blame it on how much I enjoyed The Grapes of Wrath when I was in high school.

But when one of my gaming groups hit a lull in early 2016, I began to toy with a number of ideas.  One of them derived from Pacific Northwestern gothic, one of them is an early form of a project that I'm going to present at some point, called, at the moment Numinous Trespass, and the last was an idea that came to me while showering.  Thanks to Edgar's influence I had begun to listen to music on my phone while showering, but I tended to put my Spotify on shuffle, because I'm an absolute mess when it comes to picking music to listen to.

While in the shower, I misheard a lyric from "That Old Dustbowl" by The Dustbowl Revival as "then the crops go bad, and you lose your soul" and everything came together.  I presented this last idea to the group, and I began telling stories about the characters -- a fortune teller, an gangster on the run, and an ex-preacher traveling west, hounded by a man in a black phaeton.

That was the very first version of Perdition's Teeth.  I ran it using the Nemesis system, a variant on the One Roll Engine designed to run Lovecraftian Horror (I did nothing Lovecraftian in the game -- I'd had enough of tentacles and archaic spelling by this point.)

A few months later, when I was listening to a number of amateur-run podcasts during a break between seasons on some of my favorite series, I realized that Edgar and I knew enough people to get one started.  I mentioned it in an offhand fashion on social media, and less than a week later, five-sixths of the core team were sitting in Joseph's dining room talking about possible project ideas and how we would go about doing it.

I mentioned two ideas I had, with the working titles Planetfall (which would have to change, but it was all I had,) a hard science-fiction story about three groups settling an alien world and the politics of ownership, and Babylon, Missouri, a supernatural murder story set on the banks of the Missouri river that I had tried to write as a novel but backed off from because I felt I had made several serious missteps in my composition and needed time to think on it.

After we had discussed both ideas at length, I mentioned that we could move on to new ideas after we had finished the first one, and I used Perdition's Teeth as an example, thinking that this would be an anthology series.  We put it to vote which one we would do.

My potted description of Perdition's Teeth ended up winning, and Edgar and I began writing shortly afterward, but that's how it came to be.